Go Back   Practical Boating Forums, marine forums, sailing forums, boat repair forums, inland waterways forums > Navigation and Boat Handling > Boat Handling Forum

Boat Handling Forum Whether you are pro or amatuer this forum is the place to talk about boat handling

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 25-11-2008
Skywave Skywave is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 46
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default How do you turn a long fin keel

Got a Rival 32 long fin keel. Going backwards she turns to starboard Ok but doesn't like to go to Port. Any suggestions on how to get her to turn that way when in reverse.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 25-11-2008
Capt Popeye Capt Popeye is offline
veteran Order of Advanced Poster.
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Dawlish, south Devon
Posts: 2,071
Thanks: 1,302
Thanked 217 Times in 154 Posts
Default which hand is your prop

hi there - which hand is your prop
on long keel craft the rotation of the prop (clockwise counter clockwise) has a very large influence on direction going whilst in reverse.
putting the rudder hard over can (???) sometimes counter the influence of this rotation.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 27-11-2008
Explorer
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Try putting it in neutral whilst you make the turn, with the momentum of the boat keeping you going, then the rotation of the prop won't be against you.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 30-11-2008
petersboats petersboats is offline
Old Salt
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 644
Thanks: 30
Thanked 140 Times in 107 Posts
Default

all ways a problem. especially when in the confines of a marina.
expensive suggestion but a vetus bow thruster?they take out the stress of mooring and departing the berth.
other ideas:
-depending on your mooring, is it possible to keep a line on the pontoon until you are pointing the right way?
-try putting the engine in fwd gear a touch with full starboard hand down until the boat starts to point in the right direction.
- ask your marina if you could move to an easier mooring.most marinas are helpful in these matters( well, I am in mine)
Good luck.
__________________
Regards, Peter. www.peterleonardmarine.co.uk PLeonardMarine on Twitter and Peter Leonard Marine on Facebook.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 30-09-2009
Eden Eden is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

To turn to port:-
Wheel hard to port.
Throttle forward hard for about 2 seconds and immediately throttle slow reverse.The boat will move forward slowly and turn to port.
The forward movement will be stopped but the boat will continue to turn.
As the turn slows, the throttle goes into hard forward for 1 second then back into slow reverse.
You should be able to turn a long keeler on it's length plus about 15%.

Practise in an open area for a while to get some idea of the level of thrust required for your boat.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 26-01-2011
Pagan Nev's Avatar
Pagan Nev Pagan Nev is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Grimsby, Lincolnshire
Posts: 80
Thanks: 5
Thanked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eden View Post
To turn to port:-
Wheel hard to port.
Throttle forward hard for about 2 seconds and immediately throttle slow reverse.The boat will move forward slowly and turn to port.
The forward movement will be stopped but the boat will continue to turn.
As the turn slows, the throttle goes into hard forward for 1 second then back into slow reverse.
You should be able to turn a long keeler on it's length plus about 15%.

Practise in an open area for a while to get some idea of the level of thrust required for your boat.
Hi Everything Eden has said, additionally keep the wheel hard to port throughout the manouevring part as it will have minimal effect when going astern especially on a long keeler, and it will give you something less to concern yourself with. I have seen people swinging the wheel / tiller backwards and forwards till they get in a stew.

Pagan Nev
__________________
The More I Learn The More I Realise How Little I Knew.
Any Fool Can Be Unsafe and / or Uncomfortable Afloat.
NEMO MORTALIUM OMNIBUS HORIS SAPIT
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-01-2015
sampeeter sampeeter is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 16
Thanks: 4
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

Fin Keel vs Full Keel - In order to properly understand various response and handling characteristics of a sailboat, it is important to first understand some of the inherent characteristics associated with a particular hull design.

There are a multitude of factors that contribute to the overall performance, stability and handling of a sailboat that are all incorporated into the initial design. Hull shape, keel and rudder shape and design, ballast displacement ratio, sail area, weight ratio, sail plan, etc.

The following explanations are somewhat simplified, but give you some of the basic considerations and flindamentals of keel shape and performance to be expected.
1. Faster - Faster in terms of acceleration (all displacement hulls are governed by a theoretical hull speed of which they cannot exceed in flat sea conditions). Since the amount of surface area under the boat is minimal, there is less friction being produced, less drag, and therefore it reaches hull speed quicker.

2. Ability to Turn Faster - Because the rudder is positioned well aft of the keel it can get a clean movement of water across it; so as soon as it is turned off center the deflection properties are almost instant; and therefore the boat starts turning quicker. Also, because there is a smaller lateral surface area, a fin keel boat can spin a circle in about 2/3 the distance of a full keel boat.

3. Points Higher - Due to hydrodynamic properties of the fluid movement across the keel, a lifting and driving force are being created, which in a sense pulls the boat closer to the wind. (See diagram explaining hydrody- namic lift later on.)

4. More Demanding in Rougher Weather - Due to the sensitivity of the boat regarding speed and quickness, and because the keel has less projected surface area, the boat can have a tendency to jump around a little more in rougher weather, making it more demanding on the helmsman.

Because of the above mentioned characteristics, the fin keel boat is a sportier design and is preferred over full keel boats for performance racing.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-04-2015
sonar's Avatar
sonar sonar is offline
Some Parts May Be Missing
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Southampton
Posts: 584
Thanks: 18
Thanked 107 Times in 96 Posts
Default

Once again this is a very old post.
But another look at the rudder design may help..

No In fact will help and I thought this would have arisen in one of the above posts...
Tack bits of plywood to the existing rudder till you find the answer


Then fabricate a new rudder to suit your vessel..

I had to do the same to a well known make of vessel till the rudder was very responsive . Even though the rudder was made for the vessel at the time.

It may well be easier said than done I know.... Been there done that....
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:34.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
This site and its contents copyright 2008 onwards to PracticalBoating.com and Friday Holdings Ltd

Ad Management by RedTyger